References

Examples of Allplan Engineering Civil and impressive projects around the world.

Dry Dock in Duqm Port, Oman

The construction boom on the Arabian Peninsula has reached another country: Oman. The Sultanate, from which Sinbad the Sailor once set off on his famous journeys, wants to revive its seafaring tradition and is developing several coastal areas into new port zones. One of these is Duqm Port, in the south of the country. Close to international shipping lines but also far from the notorious Strait of Hormuz, this desert-like region is to be developed into a new port with an adjoining industrial zone. The core of the new development will be two gigantic, 1,350-foot dry docks capable of servicing supertankers with a load capacity of up to 350,000 metric tons.

The challenge:

The gigantic dimensions of the project alone make it a real challenge. The two mighty dry docks and an appropriately large pump station are just one part of the project. The 250-acre area will also have various dockyard and crane installations, deep water anchorages, storage areas, accommodation and office buildings, a quay wall nearly 2 miles long and an offshore breakwater. According to the Omani government, the entire installation needs to be ready in just three years—leaving the planning of this project (with no room for errors) to be completed in a very short period of time.

The solution:

The experts at Daewoo E & C agreed that this could only be achieved using the most up-to-date methods: using Building Information Modeling as an efficient design method – and with Allplan Engineering as the best tool for the job. The system for three-dimensional general arrangement design and reinforcement detailing enables an integrated approach with a virtual structure model. The 3D model serves as the basis for the general arrangement design and reinforcement detailing from which all the other designs and schedules are derived. This enables a very efficient working method, avoiding duplicate data entries and data redundancy.


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Pumping station in Katwijk, Netherlands

Built in 1954, the pumping station in Katwijk can currently transport 54 cubic meters of water per second, which corresponds to a volume of a room of around 13 by 16 feet. Even though the plant already offers impressive output, it no longer meets future requirements. In an expansion measure, the output of the pumping station will be increased to 94 m3/s and thus almost doubled – on the one hand by upgrading the three existing pumps from diesel to electric motors, but primarily through the construction of an additional, fourth pump unit.

The challenge:

The building, the details of which were designed by Tauw based on the basic draft by architects Aletta van Aalst & Partners, has a whole series of unusual building elements. For example, in addition to the trapezoidal exterior walls of the new pump housing, there is a cylinder-shaped trough, in which the rotors of the pump move, a pump gear and round flow openings out of which the water flows. The building also has elliptical platforms on which the cleaning cranes the for the dirt collection grate will later be mounted. These are all complex forms that are difficult to cope with in 2D.

The solution:

Integrated 3D planning on a virtual building model as propagated by the BIM principle was exactly the right solution for a project of this complexity. In a first step, a complete 3D model of the new building and adjacent parts of the existing pumping station was created. The basis for this was two-dimensional plan data from the architects, which was imported to Allplan in DWG format, and scanned plans of the existing pumping station. Using this basic data, the planners generated primarily 3D solid bodies – since there were practically no standard building elements such as walls, ceilings, windows or stairs. In order to further increase the understanding of such a complex structure, visualizations were frequently calculated. As a result, problem areas could be identified more easily and corrected immediately on the screen.


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Hydroelectric Power Plant in Middle Marsyangdi, Nepal

Alternative, environmentally-sound energy systems are gaining momentum in almost all countries in the world. This has led to a need to exploit and develop renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics, solar heat, wind and hydro power. The construction of the Middle Marsyangdi Power Plant in the Lamjung District of Nepal (around 105 miles west of Kathmandu) has made it possible to utilize the country's central hydro power resources. Klaus Klafke, Project Manager at DYWIDAG International GmbH, relied upon Allplan Engineering for the planning phase of this major project.

The challenge:

The Middle Marsyangdi Hydroelectric Power Plant consists of a number of structures, some above ground and some below the surface. In order to make this possible, the planning and construction phases had to run smoothly in addition to being coordinated precisely with each other. Planning the construction of a dam in this geologically recent mountain region entails considerable difficulties. Intense monsoon rainfall also complicated the construction project; it was only possible to undertake their construction during the dry season, leading to significant delays.

The solution:

“Without Allplan, we would not have been able to handle the specific characteristics of this project as well as we did,” comments Project Manager Klaus Klafke. In the Middle Marsyangdi project, the use of Allplan Engineering significantly optimized the creation of the reinforced concrete plans. “We can only complete complex construction projects on schedule and on budget by using a professional, reliable software package. The Nepalese planners on site were also highly impressed by the sophisticated reinforcement program and the intuitive user interface,” concludes Klafke.


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Tamina Bridge in Switzerland

In 2007, an official competition was advertised for the Tamina Bridge project, which was won by the engineering office Leaonhardt, Andrä und Partner (LAP). With an arched span of 869 feet, a superstructure length of 1,368 feet and a height of 722 feet above the valley floor, the Tamina Bridge is the largest arched bridge in Switzerland.

The challenge:

Numerous stresses had to be tested, including stresses from wind and earthquakes during construction and operation, and the failure of a tension cable. Due to the plan having circular arcs at the ends of the structure, it was necessary to design a variable cross-slope of the roadway, which leads to torsion of the pavement structure in some areas of the bridge.

The solution:

As a result of their experience with many bridge construction projects, Allplan Engineering was also used as planning software from the start. Th extensive 3D functionality in particular greatly contributed to the success of the holistic planning of this very complex structure. In this way, many potential problems can still be solved in the planning phase, especially in critical areas such as intersections with very high reinforcement ratios or in anchoring areas of the pre-tensioned cables.


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Four-track extension between Olten and Aarau (Eppenberg Tunnel) in Switzerland

By the end of 2021, the four-track extension of the Olten-Aarau route is expected to relieve one of the most severe bottlenecks on the east-west axis of the Swiss rail network. The project, consisting of ten subprojects and costing approximately 865 million dollars, is a key project for more efficient passenger transport and provides sufficient capacity for freight transport in the long term. The Eppenberg Tunnel, which is just under two miles long, is being excavated from east to west with a tunnel boring machine to create the access routes and portals necessary for this expansion.

The challenge:

“The geology is very problematic, and the spatially very complex shape of the excavation pit is a major challenge for us,” explains Rainer Hohermuth, a civil engineer who works at ACS-Partner AG in Zurich. The topmost twenty feet of the excavation pit are made up of slope debris, located above rock with very deep fissures. The comprehensive excavation support with anchors ensures that these “vertical rock formations” cannot slip. This also explains the small-scale anchor arrangement with a standard distance of 5 feet in both directions. The spatial shape of the excavation pit was the second major challenge, as its lines in the plan have very different radii but are practically never straight.

The solution:

Rainer Hohermuth explains the principle as follows: “When it comes to complicated and extraordinary geometric shapes, we are much more efficient in 3D than 2D. We also have the great advantage of visual, special checks in 3D.” The project managers turned to an Allplan tool, which included the function of parametric anchors, as the draftsman could use it to assign all the desired data and descriptions to every anchor and could also use it to spatially position the anchors. In the second step, the tool applied this information to generate the list of anchors, which could be transferred directly to construction without further editing.


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The Circle at Zurich Airport in Switzerland

A high-quality superstructure is emerging at the foot of the Butzenbüel hill and within walking distance of the terminal. This is the result of a three-stage public architecture competition, the “Divers(c)ity” project, with over 90 applicants from 12 countries. The winner, Riken Yamamoto, was a 70-year-old star architect from Yokohama. With a total investment cost of around 1 billion dollars, it will provide a usable area of approximately 1,937,504 square feet. The first and second stages are expected to be completed at the end of 2018 and in 2019 respectively.

The challenge:

This new service center is expected to be brought to life by two hotels, a convention center, a medical center by the University Hospital of Zurich, retail shops, restaurants, as well as art, cultural, entertainment and educational offerings. Four buildings, including the P5 and P40 parking garages, were demolished, and the main drainage pipe from the town of Kloten, which ran through the new development site, had to be moved. “The major challenge is building these structures during normal operation, which is only possible in stages and by performing individual activities overnight,” explains Oliver Müller from dsp Ingenieure & Planer.

The solution:

The smooth import of 3D data for the existing structures and the planned building complex meant that there was an ideal starting point to integrate the new access structures into these layouts. Although both this data and the digital terrain model were partially developed using software from other providers, the data was exchanged without any problems. Development in the 3D model was particularly useful to ensure the central ramp bridge was ideally placed and, thanks to the systems’ visualization feature, various components could also be optimized in terms of their aesthetic design.


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Gotthard Base Tunnel in Switzerland

The scheduled commissioning on December 11, 2016, marked the end of the project of the century – the Gotthard Base Tunnel – after nearly 20 years of building time. Its route length of 57 kilometers through the Saint-Gotthard Massif between Erstfeld and Bodio makes the Gotthard Base Tunnel the longest rail tunnel in the world. Up to 2,600 people were involved in the implementation of the construction project of the century during the main construction phase. “For many employees, the Gotthard Base Tunnel has been their life’s work,” says Raphael Wick, overall project manager of the engineering consortium GBT Nord and representative of Gähler und Partner.

The challenge:

To enable operation of the system with two single-track tunnels, each 35 miles in length, more than 93 miles of tunnels, adits, cross-passages, and shafts had to be excavated during construction. To save time and money, the construction work on the different sections was coordinated and sometimes carried out simultaneously. The entire base tunnel, including cross-passages and multifunction stations, is double-walled. After the excavation support, a seal and an insituconcrete tunnel lining were installed. In the Erstfeld and Amsteg sections, the contractor used three formwork units, each with two 32-foot long formwork carriages, for the cladding and tunnel lining. In an ultimate feat of logistics, up to 197 feet of cladding was concreted per day. That is to say, for every ten months of building time, over 13 miles of tunnel lining were laid per tube.

The solution:

Thanks to the geometric optimization of the tunnel lining and the support from Allplan Engineering, a total of 3,143,005 cubic feet of concrete (amounting to almost 20 million dollars), was saved in the Erstfeld and Amsteg sections. The engineers from Gähler und Partner used planning in 3D anywhere there were difficult sections or problem areas, to be able to best edit these components with the help of visualizations. Also, in the cooperative relationship within the engineering consortium and with other project partners, Gähler und Partner AG profited from the reliability of Allplan Engineering when exchanging data.


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Queensferry Crossing Bridge in Scotland

A special kind of infrastructural requirement can be found in central Scotland at the Firth of Forth estuary. Three bridges in the immediate vicinity of each other span an estuary here, which reaches about 50 feet inland. The Forth Bridge, a steel bridge from 1890, has served rail traffic, while the Forth Road Bridge is a suspension bridge built in 1964, and from the summer of 2017 is to be used exclusively for bus, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic. The new Queensferry Crossing bridge now supplements these two bridges. It will be used for road traffic alone, with two lanes and an additional hard-shoulder in each direction. Towering over 656 feet in height, it is one of the largest infrastructure projects in Europe.

The challenge:

Transport Scotland’s consultants from the Jacobs Arup joint venture were not given an easy task in developing a concept for the new bridge. The bridge has to be an equal counterpart to the world cultural heritage of the “Forth Bridge.” The result was a cable-stayed bridge over a mile long with three pylons in the water. The middle pylon of the three pylons proved to be particularly challenging. In the case of traditional cable-stayed bridges, the center pylon is back-anchored via rigid side sections located at the edge. However, this approach was not possible with a three-pylon bridge, due to the very high bending moments.

The solution:

The reinforcement of the individual pylon segments had to be placed precisely in the space due to the upward-tapering cross-section. This method placed high demands on the CAD software used. That is why planners from LAP also relied on Allplan Engineering for the reinforcement and design planning. The Queensferry Crossing is the largest bridge for which 3D reinforcement planning was entirely created using Allplan Engineering. It was possible to meet deadlines and costs thanks to accurate and collision-free planning.


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Sava Bridge in Belgrade, Serbia

For years, expansion of the northern suburbs of the city of Belgrade has been hindered by the limited capacity of the three existing bridges over the Sava river. In order to expand the capacity of the transport network, a fourth bridge is currently being built. This will link the district of New Belgrade on the northern bank with the city center on the southern bank. With a total length of 3,163 feet, a structural height of 148 feet, and around 466,938 square feet of surface area, the new bridge will be the largest river crossing in the Balkan region.

The challenge:

The project is a complex one, and not only because of the dimensions involved. In order to ensure uninterrupted shipping movements during the construction period, the main section spanning the Sava must be erected in the river without temporary supports. In addition, construction will be going ahead on different sections simultaneously, under time pressure. The schedule calls for the new bridge to be handed over to the people of Belgrade after a construction period of just three years.

The solution:

LAP Consultants have benefitted from the reinforcement model integrated in Allplan Engineering. This solution, designed for interactive formwork and reinforcement planning, is particularly useful in building projects with complex geometries and reinforcement arrangements. Other important areas included the reinforcement planning of the very complicated intersection area between the superstructure and the pylon, and the planning of the anchoring of the 80 steel cables connecting the bridge decks of the main and retention areas to the pylon. Thanks to three-dimensional planning, the runs of the cables and their anchoring points could be precisely determined and visualized.


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Versamertobel Bridge in Graubünden Canton, Switzerland

As an example of steel bridge-building at the turn of the century, the former Versamertobel bridge is of considerable historic value, but is no longer up to the demands of current times. The old bridge has now been bypassed and supplemented with a modern, high-capacity, post-tensioned concrete structure that spans between elegant combined abutments/inclined piers over the Versam Gorge.

The challenge:

The brief had to consider the dramatic surroundings, the slender lines of the adjacent existing steel bridge, the difficulties of construction and the requirements for durability. The impassable, steeply sloping landscape required the engineers to think clearly through the construction process. The inclined piers had to be tied back by tension rods during construction. The bridge was built from both ends without the use of intermediate temporary supports, and the bulk of the superstructure was built in three stages.

The solution:

All the drawings were prepared using the BIM solution Allplan, which confirmed its credentials as an easy-to-use, intuitive 3D design tool. The dimensions of the details—in particular, those of the inclined piers—were carefully checked against 3D simulations in Allplan and using physical models. Oliver Müller of dsp Ingenieure & Planer said, “Allplan was a great help to us in this challenging bridge project. It was particularly useful for the 3D depictions of the design of the foundations in steeply sloping ground, as well as for the complex geometrical details and for eliminating reinforcement collisions.”


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Flowing crossover

Campus Bridge Würzburg, Germany

There is more behind the “campus bridge” than the pure avoidance of stopping traffic. The new university campus Hubland North is located on a former US military base: the Leighton area. After the US forces left this in 2009, the state of Bavaria purchased part of the land for the University of Würzburg and had parts of the former military facility converted for university use.

The challenge:

The team of Dr. Schütz Ingenieure (Kempten), Kolb Ripke Architekten and POLA Landschaftsarchitekten (both Berlin) created a design that was implemented in a single-stage realization competition at the turn of the year 2011/2012: a sophisticated structure, consisting of two narrow concrete strips converging into a small square above the street.

The solution:

Dr. Schütz Ingenieure used Allplan Engineering to model the iconic structure. With Allplan Engineering software, it was possible to optimally illustrate the complexity of the bridge in the 3D modeling. In the process, the 3D modeling of reinforcement drawings in particular contributed to ...


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Hydroelectric power station in Kempten, Germany

The new run-of-the-river power plant on the Iller river at Kempten impresses the viewer with its dynamic, elegant form. The nearly 328-foot-long sculptural shell conjures up numerous associations: from whales or waves, to polished boulders. The multiple award-winning structure was the result of a competition requesting a building design to harmonize with the protected group of buildings opposite, comprising the former Rosenau spinning and weaving works. The power plant replaces a building from the 1950’s, and currently supplies around 4,000 households with a capacity of around 14 gigawatt hours per year.

The challenge:

The architects wanted to create a highly differentiated, organic form that on one hand, blends in with its environment, but on the other, is perceived as an independent building thanks to its design. Ultimately, a concrete structure was chosen to enable the organic form enclosing the plant.

The solution:

The civil engineers first used hand drawings to determine the points at which the structure can be supported by the existing technical installations. In the next step, the engineers developed a rib structure for the concrete construction. It had to fit in with the overall image, but it was also necessary to be able to split it into six segments. Models of the concrete shell were then created with a high level of geometric detail in Allplan Engineering to serve as the basis for the reinforcement and shell design.

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A2 Freeway in Stansstad-Beckenried, Switzerland

Between 2013 and 2017, a heavily-trafficked 7.5-mile section of the A2 freeway will be redeveloped in three construction stages, costing around 283 million dollars. Between 2013 and 2017, the individual section of road, which has been in use for 40 years, will be redeveloped in three construction stages at a cost of around 280 million dollars.

The challenge:

The repair work must be carried out within a short space of time, among traffic, and in very tight spaces on site. To meet these demands, the repair work on the Stansstad section to freeway exit Stans Süd, including the preferred measures, has been divided into six phases. It is only necessary to close freeway entrances and exits for a short time during resurfacing work. Patrick Zumbühl, a graduate engineer specializing in civil engineering, explains the structural engineering features of the A2 repair, “The existing surface of the northern and southern lanes will be replaced completely and strengthened by means of milling and resurfacing. The existing longitudinal slope is between a 0.25 and 0.7 percent gradient, and therefore places high demands on the accuracy of the installation of the new road surface.”

The solution:

The project placed high demands on the accuracy of the installation of the new road surface—with Allplan Highway, it was possible to meet these demands very efficiently.

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Aare bridge in Olten (SO), Switzerland

Olten has a new landmark: the Aare Bridge, which was given over to traffic in April 2013 as part of the "Olten Region Relief" (Entlastung Region Olten, ERO) project. The new Aare Bridge design was the result of a winning competition entry; with a width of 341 feet, the Aare Bridge spans the river without supports.

The challenge:

The main challenge for reinforcement and pre-tensioning was at the highest point of the structure: The longitudinal beams (which act as a link to the cut-and-cover tunnel), the angled support (which stands on the abutment), and the concrete sail (which braces the bridge's longest support) come together here on both outer sides. These construction parts are not only reinforced for strength but are also pre-tensioned and come together in a knot, which becomes the element under the greatest stress in the whole structure.

The solution:

Thanks to the 3D visualization, the planning association commissioned to manage the project was able to show that the main intersections of the static system could meet all requirements relating to the installation of reinforcements and pre-tensioning measures, despite their minimal dimensions. For bridge construction engineer Rudolf Vogy, one thing is clear: “The reinforcement and pre-tensioning plans for this level of complexity in the structure could only be tested in the 3D model.”

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Three bridge project in Nijmegen, Netherlands

Just across the border from Germany in the Lower Rhine, Europe's largest flood protection project is under construction. It is called "Ruimte voor de Waal" – literally "more room for the Waal" – and is intended to create more space for the biggest river in the Netherlands, the Waal. For the town planners, its primarily about better flood protection: changing the course of the river by building a side arm to reduce future high-water peaks by about a foot. Extensive reworking of the city infrastructure is needed to make the project a reality.

The challenge:

The current Waal bridge will be extended by several hundred feet to span the 656-foot-wide arm of the river. Two new bridges will also be built; the Citadel bridge, which will connect the mainland to the western part of the island, and the Promenade Bridge, which will connect the mainland with the center of the island. For the engineers in charge at Witteveen + Bos, bridge building on this scale is an enormous challenge, especially as the timetable has been tight from the start. Planning such a major project without errors in such an incredibly short time is only possible – and the Dutch engineers were in full agreement – with hard work and the latest software and equipment.

The solution:

With Allplan Engineering software, the BIM system for 3D formwork and reinforcement planning enabled integrated working between the team of 10 designers and 10 engineers on the virtual support structure model. The project team was able to work simultaneously on a building model and accurately coordinate the various planning steps. “We have to create hundreds of plans for every structure in the shortest possible time,” explains Marcel Linderman, project manager at Witteveen + Bos. “We can only achieve this because we can work effectively with Allplan from the start. Thanks to integrated planning, we are able to deliver on time, and what’s more, without any errors.”

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Grubental bridge in Germany

Situated just over 3 miles southwest of Goldisthal in the Thuringian Forest, this 705-foot-long structure spans the Grubental Valley at a maximum height of 115 feet, connecting the Goldberg Tunnel with the Dunkeltal Bridge. The Grubental Bridge owes its slim design to a semi-integral construction method, almost without bearings and joints between the superstructure and the substructure. It is the first of its kind in Germany.

The challenge:

The goal of the project was to plan and build a bridge in the valley which would obstruct as little of the landscape as possible. Additionally, it had to be built with stiffness, vibration behavior, and load-bearing geometry in mind so that the tracks could be guided over the joints without rail expansion joints. Keeping these important factors in mind while navigating the narrow valley bordered by steep slopes proved difficult, indeed.

The solution:

Allplan Engineering made it possible to record the terrain in a digital terrain model with precise measurement data. The 3D model also allowed for collision tests with the horizontal element foundations. As a result, the geometrically-challenging excavation planning and mass determination were easy to deduce and integrate into the design.


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Case Study Package Engineering Civil -
Get more than 13 interesting Case Studies in one package

See from the customer's point of view how Allplan Engineering was used in different challenging customer projects and contributed tremendously to their success.

Discover new challenges and complex problems in customer projects solved with modern CAD Software. See for yourself how solutions from ALLPLAN enabled the realization of different exclusive projects.

Your advantages at a glance:

  • More than 13 exclusive projects with challenges and suitable approaches to the right solution
  • All project challenges and their approach from the customer's point of view
  • Case Studies in pdf format
  • Exclusive insights into customer projects using CAD Software

Check out the Case Study Package Engineering Civil